Communications Profiles

In order to simplify the development of solutions, ARC-IT organizes standards into groups called profiles. A communications profile defines the protocols necessary to define how information is transferred between physical objects. This includes a complete definition of the Access and TransNet Layers, any necessary Facilities Layer protocols (e.g. W3C HTTP), and any necessary Security (e.g. IETF TLS) and Management standards used by these layers. A data profile defines the necessary ITS information and the high-level rules for exchanging this information with a peer physical object, but does not define how the information is transferred. This includes definitions of data elements, messages, dialogs and message sequencing, and may also include relevant Management and Security standards.

A communications profile is paired with a data profile to create a solution. Communications profiles are re-used to support many solutions, and are listed below.

Name Description Relevant Regions
Apache Kafka lower-layer open source code that supports data distribution of specific types of data United States
Apache Kafka over Wireless lower-layer open source code that supports data distribution of specific types of data over wireless links United States
Bluetooth lower-layer standards that support wireless communications over a personal area network of up to roughly 100 meters Australia, Canada, European Union, Japan, Korea, and United States
Centre-to-Any: Wide Area Wireless Broadcast lower-layer standards that support one entity broadcasting information to all wireless devices over an area that covers at least a metropolitan area without any expectation of acknowledgement or response; security is provided by the upper-layers. Australia, European Union, and United States
Centre-to-Centre Profile using DATEX over TCP/IP lower-layer standards that support partially secure communications between two centres as commonly used in Europe. European Union
Centre-to-Centre Profile using NTCIP lower-layer standards that support partially secure communications between two centres as commonly used in the US. Australia, and United States
Dynamic Message Sign and Road Weather Information Sign Communications lower-layer standards that support communications for DMS and RWIS using SA TS 7519 via IP. Australia
I-F: AU TRAFF Comms lower-layer standards that support communication to a traffic controller. Australia
Infrastructure to Field: UTMC SNMPv2 lower-layer standards that support secure centre-to-field and field-to-field communications using simple network management protocol (SNMPv2); while this standard offers some security capabilities, implementations are strongly encouraged to use SNMPv3 to ensure adequate security. European Union
Infrastructure-to-Field: Data Distribution Service lower-layer standards that support secure data sharing and command operations between remote devices United States
Infrastructure-to-Field: Data Distribution Service over Wireless lower-layer standards that support secure data sharing and command operations between remote devices over wireless links United States
Infrastructure-to-Field: European ITS Communications to field using OCIT lower-layer ODG proprietary, published protocol used within the EU for road traffic data exchange between central stations and field devices. European Union
Infrastructure-to-Field: Secure SNMP Profile lower-layer standards that support secure centre-to-field and field-to-field communications using simple network management protocol (SNMPv3); implementations are strongly encouraged to use the TLS for SNMP security option for this solution to ensure adequate security. United States
Infrastructure-to-Field: SNMPv1 (with an option to use STMP) Profile lower-layer standards that define how SNMPv1, which does not provide any security, is used within some deployments within the ITS industry. This solution is no longer recommended due to known security vulnerabilities. United States
Infrastructure-to-Field: SNMPv1 (with an option to use STMP) Profile (partially secure) lower-layer standards that define one way to retrofit basic security into SNMPv1 implementations (mainly in the US); however, this only secures the communications link and does not provide end-application security and is not recommended for new deployments. United States
Infrastructure-to-Infrastructure: Internet proflle in the US lower-layer standards that support secure communications between ITS equipment using X.509 or IEEE 1609.2 security certificates. Australia, Canada, European Union, and United States
Infrastructure-to-Infrastructure: Guaranteed Internet proflle in the US lower-layer standards that support secure communications with guaranteed delivery between ITS equipment using X.509 or IEEE 1609.2 security certificates. Australia, Canada, European Union, and United States
Infrastructure-to-Infrastructure: UDP over IP lower-layer standards that support the Network Time Protocol that allows NTP servers to provide time synchronization services to other NTP servers and clients. Australia, Canada, European Union, Japan, and United States
Infrastructure-to-Mobile: A wireless-only variant of the SNMPv3 stack lower-layer standards that support secure infrastructure-to-mobile communications using simple network management protocol (SNMPv3). United States
Infrastructure-to-Mobile: Wireless (e.g., hot spot) Internet in the US lower-layer standards that support secure communications between two entities, either or both of which may be mobile devices, but they must be stationary or only moving within wireless range of a single wireless access point (e.g., a parked car). Security is based on X.509 or IEEE 1609.2 certificates. A non-mobile (if any) endpoint may connect to the service provider using any Intneret connection method. Canada, and United States
Infrastructure-to-Mobile: Wireless (e.g., hot spot) Internet options in the US lower-layer standards that support secure communications with guaranteed delivery between two entities, either or both of which may be mobile devices, but they must be stationary or only moving within wireless range of a single wireless access point (e.g., a parked car). Security is based on X.509 or IEEE 1609.2 certificates. A non-mobile (if any) endpoint may connect to the service provider using any Intneret connection method. Canada, and United States
Infrastructure-to-Mobile: Wireless (e.g., hot spot) Internet using X.509 lower-layer standards that support secure communications between two entities, either or both of which may be mobile devices, but they must be stationary or only moving within wireless range of a single wireless access point (e.g., a parked car). Security is based on X.509 certificates. A non-mobile (if any) endpoint may connect to the service provider using any Intneret connection method. Australia, and European Union
Infrastructure-to-Mobile: Wireless (e.g., hot spot) Internet using X.509 lower-layer standards that support secure communications with guaranteed delivery between two entities, either or both of which may be mobile devices, but they must be stationary or only moving within wireless range of a single wireless access point (e.g., a parked car). Security is based on X.509 certificates. A non-mobile (if any) endpoint may connect to the service provider using any Intneret connection method. Australia, and European Union
OASIS Advanced Message Queuing Protocol lower-layer standards that support data distribution of specific types of data European Union, and United States
OASIS Advanced Message Queuing Protocol over Wireless lower-layer standards that support data distribution of specific types of data over wireless links European Union, and United States
OASIS Message Queuing Telemetry Transport lower-layer standards that support data distribution of specific types of data Australia, and United States
OASIS Message Queuing Telemetry Transport over Wireless lower-layer standards that support data distribution of specific types of data over wireless links Australia, and United States
Positioning Receiver-to-Any lower-layer standards that support communications between connected ITS equipment and geolocation equipment such as a GPS receiver. Australia, European Union, and United States
Proprietary Communications lower-layer technologies that do not necessarily follow standards Australia, Canada, European Union, Japan, and United States
Roadside to vehicle profile for Electronic Tolling applications based on CEN-DSRC at 5.8 lower-layer standards that support electronic tolling applications using the CEN-DSRC at 5.8 GHz. Australia, and European Union
Vehicle-to-Any: Basic Transport Protocol over the G5 Profile lower-layer standards that support broadcast, near constant, low latency vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications using the ETSI GeoNetworking Bundle over the 5.9GHz spectrum. Australia, and European Union
Vehicle-to-Any: Dedicated Short Range Communications Profile using C-V2X and TCP lower-layer standards that support connection-oriented vehicle-to-any communications using the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) over C-V2X in the 5.9GHz spectrum. United States
Vehicle-to-Any: Dedicated Short Range Communications Profile using C-V2X and UDP lower-layer standards that support connectionless vehicle-to-any communications using Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) over C-V2X in the 5.9GHz spectrum. United States
Vehicle-to-Any: Dedicated Short Range Communications Profile using C-V2X and WSMP lower-layer standards that support connectionless, near constant, ultra-low latency vehicle-to-any communications using the WAVE Short Messaging Protocol (WSMP) over 3GPP C-V2X in the 5.9GHz spectrum. United States
Vehicle-to-Any: Dedicated Short Range Communications Profile using WAVE and TCP lower-layer standards that support connection-oriented vehicle-to-any communications within ~300m using the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) over IEEE WAVE in the 5.9GHz spectrum. United States
Vehicle-to-Any: Dedicated Short Range Communications Profile using WAVE and UDP lower-layer standards that support connectionless vehicle-to-any communications within ~300m using the Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) over IEEE WAVE in the 5.9GHz spectrum. United States
Vehicle-to-Any: Dedicated Short Range Communications Profile using WAVE and WSMP lower-layer standards that support connectionless, near constant, ultra-low latency vehicle-to-any communications within ~300m using the WAVE Short Messaging Protocol (WSMP) over IEEE WAVE in the 5.9GHz spectrum. The broadcast mode is interoperable with M5 FNTP. United States
Vehicle-to-Any: DSRC using TCP over IPv6 over the G5 lower-layer standards that support broadcast, near constant, low latency vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications using the ETSI GeoNetworking Bundle with TCP/IPv6 over the 5.9GHz spectrum. Australia, and European Union
Vehicle-to-Any: DSRC using UDP over IPv6 over the G5 lower-layer standards that support broadcast, near constant, low latency vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications using the ETSI GeoNetworking Bundle with UDP/IPv6 over the 5.9GHz spectrum. Australia, and European Union
Vehicle-to-Any: Local Unicast Wireless (NA) lower-layer standards that support local-area unicast wireless solutions applicable to North America, such as WAVE DSRC, LTE-V2X, LTE, Wi-Fi, etc. United States
Vehicle-to-Any: Local Unicast Wireless (NA) lower-layer standards that support local-area unicast wireless solutions applicable to the European Union, such as G5, LTE, Wi-Fi, etc. Australia, and European Union
Vehicle-to-Infrastructure: Wireless Electric Charging lower-layer standards that support communications with charging stations Australia, European Union, and United States